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Tetration and Yin & Yang
#1
A look around the scene gives sometimes surprising views... :-)

http://members.iimetro.com.au/~lofting/m...maths.html

Gottfried
Gottfried Helms, Kassel
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#2
Hi, Gottfried! Thank you for this interesting link!

As a matter of fact, the number of hexagrams of the Yi-King is 2^6 = 64 = 2^(3*2). Unfortunately, this is not a remarkable 2 # n number. In fact, we have:
2#0 = 1, 2#1 = 2, 2#2 = 4 (like 2+2 = 2*2 = 2^2, and ... so on), 2#3 = 16, 2#4 = 65536, and ... so on. But there is a link with the ... emperor of China. Number 65536 is also equal to 256 x 256, the cartesian product of two eight-bit codes, usable (and in fact presently used) by China for the binary coding of the Chinese ideographic alphabet. Two-tetra-4 is sufficient. The world is small and beautiful.

Thank you again.
Gianfranco
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#3
I read somewhere else that this is a "great discovery".

But Im am digging deep to find even a sensible meaning of this all.

It does not help that the link does not work anymore.

I see no math and no connection to tetration and do not understand what is so great about this ?

I just see a dead link , a comment about something chinese and no more posts.

I do not intent to insult posters here but this is really not how this forum should be.

Maybe if the link can be fixed or explained ...

Regards

tommy1729
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#4
(10/01/2007, 08:18 AM)GFR Wrote: ...
Number 65536 is also equal to 256 x 256, the cartesian product of two eight-bit codes, usable (and in fact presently used) by China for the binary coding of the Chinese ideographic alphabet.
...

In Mainland China, Yes. They use GB18030 because it is always 2 bytes, whereas the same characters in Unicode UTF-8 may use 2, 3, 4, or 5 bytes.

However, there is also Unicode Plane 2 (http://www.unicode.org/roadmaps/sip/) which was required because they needed to encode rare characters used only in place names and family names, etc.

So the world is beautiful, but not the encoding of CJK (Chinese-Japanese-Korean) characters.
Smile
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#5
@andydude: @GFR may not answer you because GFR had last online in nov, 2008. Wink
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